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Grundfos delivers consistent and accurate product information across channels with Adobe. 

Company Logo

Founded

1878

35,000 co-workers
Chesterfield, Missouri
mercy.net

 

 

Mercy Health named one of the

top 5 large U.S. health systems 4 years in a row

Objectives

Quickly pivot to address the COVID-19 pandemic

Create a robust, patient-friendly website

Provide the highest-possible level of patient
personalisation

 

Results

Created a COVID landing page in one day

Developed experience-driven website, including COVID health screener

Optimised conversion rates with personalised content

“Not a lot of people like going to the doctor. Not a lot of people like going to the hospital for a procedure, even when COVID wasn’t a concern. It’s a neutral experience at best. If we can make the experience better by interacting with people as individuals — and avoiding one-size-fits-all strategies — we can treat our patients with the dignity we believe they deserve.” — Ken Kellogg, Vice President, Brand and Digital Experience

It’s a hectic time to be in healthcare. The first worldwide pandemic in recent memory has put extra pressure on every medical establishment. COVID-19 is all over the news. Part of every conversation. And changing the way people live, work and interact. At the centre of the crisis are hospitals, our most precious resource for treating coronavirus patients.

To say that hospitals are under a microscope right now would be an understatement.

But there’s another factor adding tumult to the situation. The relationship between healthcare organisations and patients is changing. As a result of the global trend towards digital transformation, consumers are holding all types of organisations to new standards. Like having a customer-friendly website that parallels the retail experience, complete with relevant content, intuitive navigation, easy-to-service and capabilities like Online scheduling and purchasing. The extra-high expectations that were once only associated with the retail and hospitality industries now seem to apply across the board, from government to manufacturing to healthcare. Between the pandemic and the consumerisation of healthcare, hospitals have had to undergo a lot of change in a relatively short period of time.

Since 2016, Kellogg has worked to bring Mercy’s values to life in the digital realm. With a history of leading the digital transformations for some of the world’s biggest brands, he came to Mercy with all the necessary tools to elevate their digital experience.  But the pandemic required something more of Kellogg and team — to move faster than they’d ever moved before, all while staying true to their values.

Better experiences lead to be better health


“Healthcare is full of friction. It’s full of trap doors. It’s full of waiting on hold and then getting redirected ten minutes later. We want to get rid of that,” said Kellogg.

When Kellogg first joined Mercy, the healthcare industry’s bar for digital experiences was not set very high. Although Mercy’s in-person experiences were rooted in dignity and individual care, their values hadn’t yet been translated into their web experience. Like many healthcare organisations at the time, Mercy had a website that covered the basics, like searching for a provider and offering up contact information. But they were missing the functionalities they needed to put their online experiences on par with their in-person ones.

“We had no way to analyse, track or convert anything,” Kellogg reminisced.

Mercy's team of digital marketers were well aware of the friction that most patients experience with their healthcare providers, especially online. Consumers had become used to website features like online appointment booking, online bill paying and live chats. But even just a few years ago, these conveniences were few and far between in the healthcare industry. Mercy saw this as a major opportunity to put their values into practice — and differentiate themselves from other healthcare organisations. As Kellogg said, “We wanted to build and deliver a healthcare experience that was on par with the retail and travel experience.”

So the organisation set a goal for themselves — to build a measurable, ubiquitous, one-to-one experience across their digital presence, emerging channels and the physical space. With Kellogg’s research-driven approach and dedication to digital transformation, Mercy was in good hands. Together with his team, he sought a solution that would help them build next-level personal experiences.

 

“Not a lot of people like going to the doctor. Not a lot of people like going to the hospital for a procedure, even when COVID wasn’t a concern. It’s a neutral experience at best. If we can make the experience better by interacting with people as individuals — and avoiding one-size-fits-all strategies — we can treat our patients with the dignity we believe they deserve.” — Ken Kellogg, Vice President, Brand and Digital Experience

It’s a hectic time to be in healthcare. The first worldwide pandemic in recent memory has put extra pressure on every medical establishment. COVID-19 is all over the news. Part of every conversation. And changing the way people live, work and interact. At the centre of the crisis are hospitals, our most precious resource for treating coronavirus patients.

To say that hospitals are under a microscope right now would be an understatement.

But there’s another factor adding tumult to the situation. The relationship between healthcare organisations and patients is changing. As a result of the global trend towards digital transformation, consumers are holding all types of organisations to new standards. Like having a customer-friendly website that parallels the retail experience, complete with relevant content, intuitive navigation, easy-to-service and capabilities like Online scheduling and purchasing. The extra-high expectations that were once only associated with the retail and hospitality industries now seem to apply across the board, from government to manufacturing to healthcare. Between the pandemic and the consumerisation of healthcare, hospitals have had to undergo a lot of change in a relatively short period of time.

Since 2016, Kellogg has worked to bring Mercy’s values to life in the digital realm. With a history of leading the digital transformations for some of the world’s biggest brands, he came to Mercy with all the necessary tools to elevate their digital experience.  But the pandemic required something more of Kellogg and team — to move faster than they’d ever moved before, all while staying true to their values.

Better experiences lead to be better health


“Healthcare is full of friction. It’s full of trap doors. It’s full of waiting on hold and then getting redirected ten minutes later. We want to get rid of that,” said Kellogg.

When Kellogg first joined Mercy, the healthcare industry’s bar for digital experiences was not set very high. Although Mercy’s in-person experiences were rooted in dignity and individual care, their values hadn’t yet been translated into their web experience. Like many healthcare organisations at the time, Mercy had a website that covered the basics, like searching for a provider and offering up contact information. But they were missing the functionalities they needed to put their online experiences on par with their in-person ones.

“We had no way to analyse, track or convert anything,” Kellogg reminisced.

Mercy's team of digital marketers were well aware of the friction that most patients experience with their healthcare providers, especially online. Consumers had become used to website features like online appointment booking, online bill paying and live chats. But even just a few years ago, these conveniences were few and far between in the healthcare industry. Mercy saw this as a major opportunity to put their values into practice — and differentiate themselves from other healthcare organisations. As Kellogg said, “We wanted to build and deliver a healthcare experience that was on par with the retail and travel experience.”

So the organisation set a goal for themselves — to build a measurable, ubiquitous, one-to-one experience across their digital presence, emerging channels and the physical space. With Kellogg’s research-driven approach and dedication to digital transformation, Mercy was in good hands. Together with his team, he sought a solution that would help them build next-level personal experiences.

 

 



“I have been extremely impressed at the work Adobe puts into continuously improving XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager. Today, everyone loves working with the Adobe application and they would never go back.”

 

Bo Jensen
IT Project Coordinator, Grundfos




Improving experiences and speed with structured DITA content

When Bo Jensen first joined Grundfos, Adobe FrameMaker was the tool of choice to create highly professional documentation. As the IT Project Coordinator, it is Bo Jensen’s job to find ways to improve the documentation process and make workflows even better for technical writers. Because the 40 writers work at Grundfos offices around the world, Bo Jensen created FrameMaker templates and intuitive widgets to improve consistency and efficiency.

Bo Jensen continued to search for ways to improve the workflow and the customer experience. While writers would copy and paste standard copy between documents, content reuse was low. Updating copy involved scrolling through multiple long FrameMaker documents to find areas that need to be updated.

Most importantly, relying on PDF documents created in FrameMaker limited the customer experience. Customers who wanted their questions answered needed to go to the website, download a lengthy PDF and scroll through the guide until they found the information they were looking for. Bo Jensen wanted to give customers an easier way of getting the answers they need on any device.

Several years ago, Bo Jensen heard about a new trend in documentation that sounded like the solution Grundfos was looking for: structured DITA XML content. But finding the right component content management system (CCMS) for DITA content was no easy task. Bo Jensen required a web-based system that would make it easier to perform updates, check systems and collaborate with writers anywhere.

After a false start with another CCMS that was not up to Grundfos standards, Bo Jensen heard about XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager. As Grundfos was already using Adobe Experience Manager to manage its website, executives jumped on the idea of maximising existing investments for documentation content.

“XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager was still a new application at the time, but I trusted Adobe,” says Bo Jensen. “I knew that Adobe could make the application everything that we needed in a CCMS. I have been extremely impressed at the work Adobe puts into continuously improving XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager.”

Focusing on improving content for customers

Grundfos now creates all content in DITA format. The company developed a built-in migration tool to help convert all existing FrameMaker files into DITA so that content can be added to the CCMS and reuse across documents. Writers love working with the web editor in XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager, which makes it simple for people to create and edit files online.

“I’m a big advocate for cloud-based authoring, especially for a disperse team like ours,” says Bo Jensen. “Writers can create, update and review content from anywhere and edits are automatically applied to every system inside the company. It makes it much easier to collaborate and share work with not only other writers, but other departments.”

Working in DITA format, technical writers don’t need to worry about layout, style or design. With a click of a button, the fast DITA-OT rendering engine in XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager turns content into DITA Merge XML files. These DITA Merge XML files can be turned into any type of output based on pre-designed stylesheets, from PDF files to HTML content and more.

“By removing layout and design decisions, writers can focus on improving content and creating more accurate and valuable information for customers,” says Bo Jensen. “We have more than 777,000 individual topics so far, with more created all the time. Writers can reuse topics across document types or product lines. This improves consistency, but it also further saves times for writers as they spend less time copying or rewriting content.”

Updates are much easier and faster, as writers can quickly edit individual topics. If the topic is shared across multiple documents, updates can be automatically applied to each.

This also leads to faster translations. When topics are updated, writers can send just the updated sections for translation. While writers previously expected translation turnaround times of up to seven weeks, now updates are returned in an hour.

“With more reuse, easy updates and fast translation, we are achieving a much faster time to market,” says Bo Jensen. “We can deliver documentation for new products or fix errors as soon as they’re spotted. XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager allows us to be much faster with documentation today.”

 



“With more reuse, easy updates and fast translation, we are achieving a much faster time to market. XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager allows us to be much faster with documentation today.”

 

Bo Jensen
IT Project Coordinator, Grundfos


 


Creating new experiences by reuse product information

The next step for Grundfos is to start using DITA content across more channels. Bo Jensen has ideas for how content can be reuse across the website, mobile apps and virtual training sessions to help customers access information much more quickly and easily. For example, instead of customer needing to download a PDF file, the support portal could display a lightweight interface that allows customers to look up an error code and instantly view troubleshooting steps. An augmented reality training module for service representatives could pull part descriptions from the CCMS.

“We have so many ideas for how we can reuse content and it’s not the far-off future,” says Bo Jensen. “We have all of the technology that we need right now. We just need to start showing teams how they can use DITA content today. With XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager, we’re on our way to finding new ways of providing content to customers and giving them a fantastic experience with Grundfos.”

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